Failure Free Reading | New Hope For Non-Readers | Educators | Dramatic Help For Your Not-Yet Readers
 
 
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For 25 years, Failure Free Reading has been the
intervention that schools turn to when all others have failed!
Jeff Clayton - https://jeffclayton.wordpress.com - Senior Software Engineer/IT Director
ID Teacher calls Failure Free "an AMAZING reading program" [ MORE ]    
 
Research: Evidence-based, Replicable and Reliable

Well-grounded in theory, Failure Free Reading's methodology is one of the most thoroughly-researched in K-12 education! In scores of studies, the program has consistently produced significant/sustained gains in word recognition/attack, comprehension, and spelling for students testing below 15%, without the need for expensive tutoring or coaching. Student's attitudes, behavior, and self-confidence also consistently improved.


The following are some of the instruments that have been used to assess student reading growth through Failure Free Reading: Stanford Achievement, Ohio Proficiency, Woodcock Johnson, MAT7, NC EOG, MS EOG, ITBS, TN EOG, WISC-R, STAR Reading, FCAT, Likert Surveys, MEAP, LEAP, and Curriculum Based.


The data have been collected and the studies have been conducted by university researchers, district evaluators, school personnel, independent evaluators, and internally. Throughout all evaluations, Failure Free Reading has demonstrated success in accelerating the learning curve of the lowest reading students.


Here is a summary of the various studies that have been conducted:




Published peer-reviewed studies:


Effects of Failure Free Reading on culturally and linguistically diverse students with learning disabilities. Multiple Voices.

In a one year study of 60 LD grade 3-5 students in Klein ISD, the number of students with severe discrepancies in reading decreased by more than 50%.
England, G., Collins, S., & Algozzine, B. (n. d.). Effects of Failure Free Reading on culturally and linguistically diverse
students with learning disabilities. Multiple Voices, 5 (1), 28-37.


Effects of the Failure Free Reading program on students with severe reading disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities.

In a 7 month study of 39 LD students in Klein ISD, the number of students with severe discrepancies in reading decreased by more than 50%.
Rankhorn, B., England, G., Collins, S. M., Lockavitch, J. F., & Algozzine, B. (1998). Effects of the Failure Free Reading program on students with severe reading disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 31 (3), 307-312.


Implementing Failure-Free Reading with students seriously at-risk for failure. Australian Journal of Learning Disabilities.

Following a 7 month study of 165 first graders at risk of for serious reading failure, 52% of the students were reading at the 1st grade (Metropolitan) and 35% at the 2nd grade level.
Algozzine, B., Lockavitch, J. F., & Audette, R. (1997). Implementing Failure-Free Reading with students seriously at-risk for failure. Australian Journal of Learning Disabilities, 2 (3), 14-17.


Effects of intensive remedial reading instruction. Journal of At-Risk Issues.

91 primary age students made significant gains in word recognition, silent reading and student attitudes.
Slate, J., Algozzine, B., & Lockavitch, J. F. (1998). Effects of intensive remedial reading instruction. Journal of At-Risk Issues, 5 (1), 30-35.


Effects of the Failure Free Reading program on students at-risk for reading failure. Special Services in the Schools.

19 first grade students at risk for serious reading difficulties made significant gains in letter recognition, letter naming, pronunciation of words in isolation, understanding short passages and Broad Reading Cluster scores.
Algozzine, B., & Lockavitch, J. F. (1998). Effects of the Failure Free Reading program on students at-risk for reading failure. Special Services in the Schools, 13 (1/2), 95-103.


Accelerating the growth curve: Improving opportunities for children at risk for reading failure. Proven Practice.

In a two year study involving 235 Title 1 elementary students, almost one half of the first year cohort would have no longer qualified for special education services. Of that group, 61% maintained master level performance (MAT) three years following treatment.
Lockavitch, J. F., Morgan, L., & Algozzine, B. (1999). Accelerating the growth curve: Improving opportunities for children at risk for reading failure. Proven Practice, 1 (2), 60-67.


Effects of intensive intervention on students at-risk for reading failure. The Florida Reading Quarterly.

In a randomized trial, one year study of 58 3rd and 4th graders, the treatment cohort made statistically significant gains in attitudes, word recognition and silent reading.
Lockavitch, J. F., & Algozzine, B. (1998). Effects of intensive intervention on students at-risk for reading failure. The Florida Reading Quarterly, 35 (2), 27-31.


National Assessment of Title I Interim Report to Congress: Volume II: Closing the Reading Gap, First Year Findings from a Randomized Trial of Four Reading Interventions for Striving Readers. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences.

The federally funded "Power4Kids" study reported that Failure Free Reading impacted the achievement gap in reading at the third grade level.
Torgesen, Joseph, David Myers, Allen Schirm, Elizabeth Stuart, Sonya Vartivarian, Wendy Mansfield, Fran Stancavage, Donna Durno, Rosanne Javorsky, and Cinthia Haan. National Assessment of Title I Interim Report to Congress: Volume II: Closing the Reading Gap, First Year Findings from a Randomized Trial of Four Reading Interventions for Striving Readers. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, 2006.


Final Report on the National Assessment of Title I: Summary of Key Findings. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences.

The final "Power4Kids" report reported that one year following treatment, FFR was the only program to show permanent long-term impact in all four areas of reading measured (with the 3rd grade cohort), producing statistically significant effect sizes in 4 of the 7 reading outcomes measured: Word Attack, Sight Word Reading, Fluency and Passage Comprehension. More importantly, none of the phonics-based interventions produced statistically significant results in either measure of reading comprehension administered.
Final Report on the National Assessment of Title I: Summary of Key Findings. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, 2007. Section lllA.


"Modifying the brain activation of poor readers during sentence comprehension with extended remedial instruction: A longitudinal study of neuroplasticity"

This companion study to "Power4Kids" reported, Carnie-Mellon and MIT researchers reported that intensive language development was just as beneficial in closing the reading gap at the 3rd grade level - and rebuilding cortical matter in the brain -- as word level programs.
Ann Meyler, Timothy A. Keller, Vladimir L. Cherkassky, John D. E. Gabrieli, and Marcel Adam Just. "Modifying the brain activation of poor readers during sentence comprehension with extended remedial instruction: A longitudinal study of neuroplasticity" Neuropsychologia 46 (2008): 2580-2592.


Altering Cortical Connectivity: Remediation-Induced Changes in the White Matter of Poor Readers.

At the one follow-up (to the Meyler et all study) scan, dramatic visual evidence was reported that (intensive language development intervention) can actually rebuild cortical white matter in underperforming brain areas of poor readers - bringing them back to the normal range!
Timothy A. Keller, Marcel Adam Just. Altering Cortical Connectivity: Remediation-Induced Changes in the White Matter of Poor Readers. Neuron, 2009; 64 (5): 624-631 DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2009.10.018. Download at http://www.psy.cmu.edu/news/news_2009_12_10.pdf



Case Studies:


Elementary special education students achieve district DRA criteria for grade level reading. Round Rock ISD - TX (PDF)


Elementary, Middle and High School special Education students improve alternative test scores, confidence and esteem in large suburban/rural TX district. Comal ISD - TX (PDF)


2nd & 3rd grade Tier lll RtI, special education and English Language Learners students in large suburban elementary school. Cooper Elementary - Tulsa, OK (PDF)


Moderately to profoundly handicapped elementary students make dramatic gains in fluency, comprehension and esteem. Students with Autism (PDF)


High school age special education students improve reading, writing and confidence. Matanzas High School - Palm Coast, FL (PDF)


Urban special education and ELL students severely delayed in reading boost their rate of achievement in reading by 4 times. District of Columbia Summer School (PDF)



Additional Studies, Reviews and Reports:



At risk 3rd and 5th graders make dramatic gains in reading during summer school. Dulles Elementary - Chicago Public Schools, IL (PDF)


High school English Language Learners average almost 4 years in growth on SAT9 in just one school year. Coronado High School - El Paso, TX (PDF)